Logo Leibniz Universität Hannover
Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät
Logo Leibniz Universität Hannover
Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät
  • Zielgruppen
  • Suche
 

Vertiefungsfach Entwicklungs- und Umweltökonomik

Aufbau

Das ökonomische Vertiefungsfach umfasst im Masterstudiengang Wirtschaftsingenieur (3 Semester) 24 Leistungspunkte. Aufgrund der Neustrukturierung der ökonomischen Vertiefungsfächer im Bachelorstudiengang Wirtschaftswissenschaft ab Sommersemester 2015 gilt für das ökonomische Vertiefungsfach folgende Übergangsregelung bei Studienbeginn im Master zum Sommersemester 2015 und Sommersemester 2016:

  • 1 Pflichtmodul à 5 Leistungspunkte im 1. Semester
  • 1 Seminar à 4 Leistungspunkte während 1.-3. Semester
  • 3 Wahlpflichtmodule (fakultative Module) mit insgesamt 15 Leistungspunkten während 1.-3. Semester

Bitte beachten Sie, dass sich der Titel des jeweiligen Pflichtmoduls im ersten Semester im Vergleich zur PO 2006 durch die Neustrukturierung zum Teil leicht geändert hat. Bitte orientieren Sie sich an den Bezeichnungen gemäß PO 2012, die Anmeldung erfolgt mit den Bezeichnungen gemäß PO 2006.

SoSe 2017

WS 17/18

SoSe 2018

Pflichtmodul (PO 2012)

Global Food Security

X

 

X

Seminar

Seminar Entwicklungsökonomie

X

X

X

Seminar Microfinance

X

 

X

Seminar Empirische Analysen volkswirtschaftlicher Zusammenhänge

X

 

 

Fakultative
Module / Wahlpflichtmodule
1

Environmental Economics

 

X

 

International Competitiveness

X

X

X

International Agricultural Policy

X

 

X

Environmental Economics of Developing Countries

X

 

X

Planning and Evaluation of Development Projects

X

 

Energy Economics

X

Water Economics

X

X

Econometrics

X

X

Arbeiten mit Umfragedaten

X

X

Advanced International Economics

X

X

Labour and Development

X

X

 

Intergenerational Mobility

 

 

Distribution Theory

X

X

Sustainability Economics

X

 

Bedeutung und Effekte wirtschaftspolitischer Entscheidungen für Unternehmen

X

 

Theoriegeschichte

X

 

 1 Voraussichtliches Angebot


Subject

“We are here to make a commitment to action. I have seen such progress with my own eyes, in my own country, in my own lifetime. And we have evidence of success in many other places.”

“It has been a joint effort – involving governments, farmers, civil society, academia and the private sector. From small-scale farmers who trade their surplus at the village market to billion-dollar multinational corporations, business has played a vital role. This is needed now more than ever.”

(Ban Ki-moon, UN, during the signing of the Zero Hunger Challenge, Davos, January 2014)

At the same time, natural disasters like droughts, tsunamis, hurricanes, typhoons and floods have been increasing over the past 25 years. And as a result of climate change, it is expected that over forty countries will no longer exist by the end of the century. (UNU-EHS, 2008; UNISDR, 2014). These and other development and environmental issues are central to teaching as part of the specialization 'Development and Environmental Economics'.

In fact, issues of poverty, food security and the environment are increasingly being discussed in an economic context. Understanding these relationships and the factors that determine these processes are a prerequisite for scientifically trained economists to work in global private companies and international organizations. International companies operating in emerging market economies and developing countries can no longer afford to ignore development and environmental issues. The consideration of social and environmental issues and the assessment of the environmental and socio-economic conditions in the partner countries have become part of modern corporate social responsibility strategies and create new opportunities and challenges. In addition, companies engaged in the value chain of agriculture and the food industry have an outstanding importance for the whole economy and for economic development. These areas will also be affected in a particular way by national policy, bilateral and multinational preferential agreements and international trading arrangements under the World Trade Organization. Knowledge about these relationships and influences are deepened in selected development and environmental economics modules.

Objective

The teaching and research at the two institutes of "Development and Agricultural Economics" and for "Environmental Economics and World Trade," aim to create the necessary theoretical and methodological basis for understanding the interlinkages to prepare students for working in these areas. The students should be able to analyze the links between poverty and environmental issues from an economic point of view. They also learn to assess the world food situation and economic development.

Contents

The teaching programme includes both method-oriented contents from the development and environmental economics, as well as problem-oriented courses in the fields of agricultural policy, environment and social issues in developing countries.

Global Food Security & Global Environmental Economics

In the two modules Global Food Security and Global Environmental Economics, students are confronted with questions such as 1) What are the causes of poverty and underdevelopment? 2) What is the role of agriculture and environmental and natural resource management in the development process of poor countries? 3) How can we quantify and evaluate environmental problems and what policies are available to reduce negative externalities or receive environmental services such as biodiversity?

Seminar Development Economics

The Seminar Development Economics is offered to students of economics and management (and related fields) who major in development or environmental economics. The students will prepare a seminar paper and give a presentation of a topic related to development economics.

Seminar Microfinance

This seminar is targeted at students who are interested in microfinance, which is the supply of financial services to low income people. The seminar starts with a series of four lectures, followed by group work. Groups are requested to study the supply of microfinance in a selected country and to propose an innovative microfinance product tailored to this country.

International Agricultural Policy

In the optional module International Agricultural Policy, impacts of agricultural, food, consumer and environmental policies and international trade agreements on the development process of a country are central. In addition, for example, causes that have led to the food crisis, are analyzed and discussed.

International Competitiveness

In the module International Competitiveness, students are confronted with the question: How can you assess the international competitiveness of a country or a company? In addition to the analysis of international trade, also aspects of New Institutional Economics play a special role.

Energy Economics

Access to energy is the linchpin of industrial production. Yet the energy market itself is not an ordinary commodity market. In this context many questions arise: What drives energy prices on this market? How is trade of energy products regulated and distorted? How do players deal with market imbalances? How do environmental concerns factor in? This course will provide you with tools to analyse these and other questions linked to energy value chain. With an emphasis on environmental issues we will cover topics surrounding the energy sector like the certification schemes, CO2 trade, national and global institutions, resource management, market power and others.

Environmental Economics of Developing Countries

The main issues of the module Environmental Economics of Developing Countries are causes and extent of environmental problems in developing countries and methods of economic evaluation. Examples in this context are environmental effects of technologies and natural resource use, e.g. pesticides, genetic engineering technologies for food and agriculture, soil erosion, water management, forests and fisheries.

Planning and Evaluation of Development Projects

The optional module Planning and Evaluation of Development Projects addresses issues related to the economic evaluation of public investments in development projects, including the concepts of the cost-benefit analysis.

Water Economics

The course Water Economics provides an introduction into the economics of water use and water resource management. The following topics will be covered: The fundamentals of water supply and water utilization against the background of the limited availability of and increasing pressure on water resources world-wide, input-output evaluation methods, water as a public versus private good, institutions and payment/funding systems for effective water supply and water utilization, the role of water-related policies such as the EU-water directives. The course will be supplemented with case studies from developing countries, describing water resource management programs, their objectives, scale, implementation challenges, and effects.

Econometrics

Introduction to different econometric models (OLS regression, Panel, IV models, Binary outcome models, etc.) and critical assessment of their results; use of simple econometric models based on real world examples from resource and development economics using the Stata software packages (no previous knowledge required for Stata).

Sustainability Economics

This course introduces and operationalizes the notion of sustainability from an economic perspective. It provides students with the theoretical basis of sustainability as inter- and intra-generational issues, and elaborates how sustainability can be operationalized in an economic context. The course covers a range of topics focusing on the interactions between economic growth, development, and the environment. Development issues such as population growth, urbanization, and migration as well as environmental problems such as depletion of natural resources and degradation of environmental quality are taken into account. The lectures are designed in an interactive way, including theories, case studies, exercises, and student presentations.

Advanced Development and Environmental Economics

Economic growth and development are closely interacted with natural resources and the environment. Such interactions are intricately linked with the everyday life of individual persons and households, especially in developing countries. Sustainability is a much more immediate concept, since it must take into account of pressing concerns such as basic subsistence and even survival. Therefore, the aim of the course is to provide students with an understanding of the relationship between economic growth, development and environmental issues with the focus on developing countries.

Special Topics of Development Economics

The module Special Topics of Development Economics includes questions such as: What is the role of multilateral and bilateral, governmental and non-governmental organizations in the field of development cooperation? Which theoretical development concepts underpin the approach of most important organizations in development cooperation and how are these concepts implemented? Furthermore, what factors determine the economic cooperation between developed and emerging and developing countries?

Reference to other subjects

The subject combines well with the following advanced subjects:

  • Money and Internation Finance
  • Economic Theory.